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INVESTIGATIONS
Problems that most deserve our attention
often don't make headlines.
 
They're entrenched in our way of thinking, tied into lifestyles and societal structures — hiding in plain sight but all too easy to pass by.
The list reads as long as it cuts deep:
Racial prejudices, environmental degradation, female subjugation, capitalist exploitation...
Minds need to be challenged.
And framing issues like these using investigative and creative storytelling can contribute to much needed empathy and constructive awareness. It has to go beyond just news.
Here you can find some of the stories that have most incensed me.
I hope they can provoke your thinking.

1.
VANISHING GIRLS
WEST BENGAL
of
In the North Eastern state of India, the past decades have seen an epidemic of child trafficking grow to infect West Bengal’s rural communities.
Since 2011, thousands of children have been reported missing or presumed kidnapped, the majority of whom are sold into India's burgeoning, gang-run forced prostitution industry.

This four-year investigation aims to humanely explore the socio-economic contexts perpetuating child trafficking, to reveal the trafficking routes and mechanisms by which girls are systematically kidnapped, abused and sold into criminal hubs such as Kolkata’s red-light district of Sonagachi, and to highlight the challenges state and NGO actors face in tackling an issue mired by nationwide crises of corruption, development, gender inequality and rising sectarianism.
40,000
Since 2011 over
children have gone missing
in West Bengal (Source: UNHCR)
2.
INDIA'S COAL RUSH
A NATION ABLAZE
India's capital New Delhi is notorious for its skyline blanketed by an opaque and suffocating smog. Once vibrant greenlands scattered across fertile states are now overrun by sprawling coal fields and fire-spouting factories. And the river Ganges, flowing through the country like an artery, has been poisoned by chemical waste and sewage.

With Prime Minister Modi backing an energy agenda set to double coal production by 2020—fuelling promises of bringing electricity to the rural poor—India is now a battleground for urgent global environmental concerns pitted against rapid national development. 

This ongoing investigation aims to unpack and visualise the issue of air pollution in India. By investigating ten areas across the nation most acutely affected - from larger cities such as Gwalior, Jharia and Raipur to smaller cancer villages near such as Sadopur in Greater Noida, and Sher Singh Wala in Punjab - the project will humanise the impact on individuals and to society of worsening air pollution through character-led explorations of health related ailments to changes in agrarian and urban livelihoods. 

Culminating in a multimedia body of work, this investigation will be suited to interactive online platforms and print publication. Its human focus has the potential to engage and inform new audiences of India’s devastating air pollution - an issue which threatens the future of the world as a whole.
1.1 M
people die prematurely from India’s rapidly worsening air pollution every year.

The country is now home to the world’s most dangerous air, having recently surpassed even China.
JHARIA - A TOWN ON FIRE
Chapter 1
Jharia lies at the heart of India’s largest coal belt, in the north-east state of Jharkhand, producing most of the country's coking coal required in the production of steel and thermo-electricity plants. Yet the vast open cast mines that stretch through these lands lie on top of underground fires that have been burning for over a century. Recent mining expansions have provoked these flames causing open fires to erupt along the earth's surface, spewing noxious gases and destroying the land. This chapter looks into the poverty-stricken and forgotten lives of people governed by India's billion dollar coal operations - the dirty end of a dirty business.
READ NOW
INVESTIGATIONS
PROBLEMS THAT MOST DESERVE OUR ATTENTION OFTEN DON'T MAKE HEADLINES. 

Entrenched in our way of thinking, they're tied into lifestyles and societal structures, hiding in plain sight but all too easy to pass by.
 
The list reads as long as it cuts deep: racial prejudices, environmental degradation, female subjugation, capitalist exploitation...

Minds need to be challenged. And framing issues like these using investigative and creative storytelling can contribute to much needed empathy and constructive awareness. It has to go beyond just news.

Here you can find some of the stories that have most incensed me. I hope they can provoke your thinking.
1.
VANISHING GIRLS
WEST BENGAL
of
In the North Eastern state of India, the past decades have seen an epidemic of child trafficking grow to infect West Bengal’s rural communities.
Since 2011, thousands of children have been reported missing or presumed kidnapped, the majority of whom are sold into India's burgeoning, gang-run forced prostitution industry.

This four-year investigation aims to humanely explore the socio-economic contexts perpetuating child trafficking, to reveal the trafficking routes and mechanisms by which girls are systematically kidnapped, abused and sold into criminal hubs such as Kolkata’s red-light district of Sonagachi, and to highlight the challenges state and NGO actors face in tackling an issue mired by nationwide crises of corruption, development, gender inequality and rising sectarianism.
40,000
Since 2011 over
children have gone missing
in West Bengal (Source: UNHCR)
2.
INDIA'S COAL RUSH
A NATION ABLAZE
India's capital New Delhi is notorious for its skyline blanketed by an opaque and suffocating smog. Once vibrant greenlands scattered across fertile states are now overrun by sprawling coal fields and fire-spouting factories. And the river Ganges, flowing through the country like an artery, has been poisoned by chemical waste and sewage.

With Prime Minister Modi backing an energy agenda set to double coal production by 2020—fuelling promises of bringing electricity to the rural poor—India is now a battleground for urgent global environmental concerns pitted against rapid national development. 

This ongoing investigation aims to unpack and visualise the issue of air pollution in India. By investigating ten areas across the nation most acutely affected - from larger cities such as Gwalior, Jharia and Raipur to smaller cancer villages near such as Sadopur in Greater Noida, and Sher Singh Wala in Punjab - the project will humanise the impact on individuals and to society of worsening air pollution through character-led explorations of health related ailments to changes in agrarian and urban livelihoods. 

Culminating in a multimedia body of work, this investigation will be suited to interactive online platforms and print publication. Its human focus has the potential to engage and inform new audiences of India’s devastating air pollution - an issue which threatens the future of the world as a whole.
1.1 M
people die prematurely from India’s rapidly worsening air pollution every year.

The country is now home to the world’s most dangerous air, having recently surpassed even China.
JHARIA - A TOWN ON FIRE
Chapter 1
Jharia lies at the heart of India’s largest coal belt, in the north-east state of Jharkhand, producing most of the country's coking coal required in the production of steel and thermo-electricity plants. Yet the vast open cast mines that stretch through these lands lie on top of underground fires that have been burning for over a century. Recent mining expansions have provoked these flames causing open fires to erupt along the earth's surface, spewing noxious gases and destroying the land. This chapter looks into the poverty-stricken and forgotten lives of people governed by India's billion dollar coal operations - the dirty end of a dirty business.
READ NOW
1. CHILD TRAFFICKING IN INDIA
2. THE HUMAN COST OF POLLUTION
1.
VANISHING GIRLS
WEST BENGAL
of
In the North Eastern state of India, the past decades have seen an epidemic of child trafficking grow to infect West Bengal’s rural communities.
Since 2011, thousands of children have been reported missing or presumed kidnapped, the majority of whom are sold into India's burgeoning, gang-run forced prostitution industry.

This four-year investigation aims to humanely explore the socio-economic contexts perpetuating child trafficking, to reveal the trafficking routes and mechanisms by which girls are systematically kidnapped, abused and sold into criminal hubs such as Kolkata’s red-light district of Sonagachi, and to highlight the challenges state and NGO actors face in tackling an issue mired by nationwide crises of corruption, development, gender inequality and rising sectarianism.
40,000
Since 2011 over
children have
gone missing in
West Bengal
(Source: UNHCR)
2.
ASIA'S RISKY RACE
NATIONS ABLAZE
India and China's environmental problems are as epic and sweeping as the two countries' economic ambitions. The capitals of Beijing and New Delhi are notorious for skylines blanketed by an opaque and suffocating smog, where children grow up with asthma and severe respiratory illnesses. Once vibrant greenlands scattered across fertile states such as Hebei in China and Jharkhand in India are now overrun by sprawling coal fields and fire-spouting factories. And the nations' water supplies today stand grossly polluted, with Ganges and the Yangtze's watershed areas poisoned with carcinogenic chemical waste and sewage.

In 2014, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang 'declared war' on pollution. And in 2016, Indian Prime Minister Modi proclaimed an energy agenda set to double coal production by 2020—fuelling promises of bringing electricity to the country's vast rural poor. As the world's most populous nations, India and China are today the battleground for urgent global environmental concerns pitted against rapid national development.
This ongoing investigation aims to unpack and visualise the issues of air and water pollution across India and China. Using character-led stories in ten acutely affected areas across the two nations - from larger cities such as Beijing and Mumbai, cancer villages such as Xingtai (Hebei) and Sher Singh Wala (Punjab), and massive mining zones such as Jharia (Jharkhand) and Bayan Obo (Inner Mongolia) - this project aims humanise the impact on individuals and to society of worsening air and water pollution, exposing issues from health related ailments to changes in agrarian and urban livelihoods. Culminating in a multimedia body of work, this investigation's human focus has the potential to engage and inform new audiences of Asia's devastating pollution - an issue which today threatens the future of the world as a whole.
1.1 M
people die prematurely from India’s rapidly worsening air pollution every year.

The country is now home to the world’s most dangerous air, having recently surpassed even China.
JHARIA - A TOWN ON FIRE
Chapter 1
Jharia lies at the heart of India’s largest coal belt, in the north-east state of Jharkhand, producing most of the country's coking coal required in the production of steel and thermo-electricity plants. Yet the vast open cast mines that stretch through these lands lie on top of underground fires that have been burning for over a century. Recent mining expansions have provoked these flames causing open fires to erupt along the earth's surface, spewing noxious gases and destroying the land. This chapter looks into the poverty-stricken and forgotten lives of people governed by India's billion dollar coal operations - the dirty end of a dirty business.
COMING SOON
1. CHILD TRAFFICKING IN INDIA
2. THE HUMAN COST OF POLLUTION
1.
VANISHING GIRLS
WEST BENGAL
of
In the North Eastern state of India, the past decades have seen an epidemic of child trafficking grow to infect West Bengal’s rural communities.
Since 2011, thousands of children have been reported missing or presumed kidnapped, the majority of whom are sold into India's burgeoning, gang-run forced prostitution industry.

This four-year investigation aims to humanely explore the socio-economic contexts perpetuating child trafficking, to reveal the trafficking routes and mechanisms by which girls are systematically kidnapped, abused and sold into criminal hubs such as Kolkata’s red-light district of Sonagachi, and to highlight the challenges state and NGO actors face in tackling an issue mired by nationwide crises of corruption, development, gender inequality and rising sectarianism.
40,000
Since 2011 over
children have gone missing
in West Bengal (Source: UNHCR)
2.
ASIA'S RISKY RACE
NATIONS ABLAZE
India and China's environmental problems are as epic and sweeping as the two countries' economic ambitions. The capitals of Beijing and New Delhi are notorious for skylines blanketed by an opaque and suffocating smog, where children grow up with asthma and severe respiratory illnesses. Once vibrant greenlands scattered across fertile states such as Hebei in China and Jharkhand in India are now overrun by sprawling coal fields and fire-spouting factories. And the nations' water supplies today stand grossly polluted, with Ganges and the Yangtze's watershed areas poisoned with carcinogenic chemical waste and sewage.

In 2014, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang 'declared war' on pollution. And in 2016, Indian Prime Minister Modi proclaimed an energy agenda set to double coal production by 2020—fuelling promises of bringing electricity to the country's vast rural poor. As the world's most populous nations, India and China are today the battleground for urgent global environmental concerns pitted against rapid national development.

This ongoing investigation aims to unpack and visualise the issues of air and water pollution across India and China. Using character-led stories in ten acutely affected areas across the two nations - from larger cities such as Beijing and Mumbai, cancer villages such as Xingtai (Hebei) and Sher Singh Wala (Punjab), and massive mining zones such as Jharia (Jharkhand) and Bayan Obo (Inner Mongolia) - this project aims humanise the impact on individuals and to society of worsening air and water pollution, exposing issues from health related ailments to changes in agrarian and urban livelihoods.

Culminating in a multimedia body of work, this investigation's human focus has the potential to engage and inform new audiences of Asia's devastating pollution - an issue which today threatens the future of the world as a whole.
1.1 M
people die prematurely from India’s rapidly worsening air pollution every year.

The country is now home to the world’s most dangerous air, having recently surpassed even China.
JHARIA - A TOWN ON FIRE
Chapter 1
Jharia lies at the heart of India’s largest coal belt, in the north-east state of Jharkhand, producing most of the country's coking coal required in the production of steel and thermo-electricity plants. Yet the vast open cast mines that stretch through these lands lie on top of underground fires that have been burning for over a century. Recent mining expansions have provoked these flames causing open fires to erupt along the earth's surface, spewing noxious gases and destroying the land. This chapter looks into the poverty-stricken and forgotten lives of people governed by India's billion dollar coal operations - the dirty end of a dirty business.
COMING SOON